2) Dole, Nick. “Meow-Meow’s Travel Pass Implant Could Be Deactivated.” ABC News, 28 June 2017, www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-28/opal-card-meow-meow-implant-could-be-deactivated-by-authorities/8658986.

The history of biohacking is an interesting form of body modification. Not only is the individual making a major modification of their body, but they are also becoming one with the piece of technology they are implanting into their body. What makes biohacking an interesting form of body modification is that as bio-technology grows it has left the world of hacks being created in ones home to happening in laboratories around the world. These implants are often in various parts of the body and allow the user to become one with a piece of technology. A wide array of items can be bio-hacked into the body from magnets to microchip(1) some of these biohacks can be used to enhance the wearers life like the case in which the bio-hacker Meow-Ludo Disco Gamma Meow-Meow commonly referred to as Meow Meow hacked his Opal transit card into his hand so he can enter the Sydney transit system by waving his hand in front of the stations NFC reader(2). Sadly Meow Meow had to take his biohack off after it was determined in court as a breach of the law. What makes biohacking an interesting form of body modification because these body modifications are happening in both the home, piercing studios, and in laboratories around the world. For example, individuals who choose to add a small magnet to the tips of their fingers to feel magnetic pulses can implant them at home using or in a studio. I am going to describe how Splinter News’s Alexis Madrigal received their implant(3). They went to two individuals who identify themselves as “grinders” which are individuals who perform do it yourself biohacks from their homes. In Alexis case the tip of his finger was numbed using a numbing agent and with a scalpel a small pocket was cut into his finger where the magnet was then placed. After ensuring proper placement of the magnet his finger was stitched up and that was the end of his procedure. In the months since their procedure they have complained about losing some sensations in their fingertips but can control various items from paperclips to bottle caps with their finger.

3) Madrigal, Alexis. “I Got a Magnet Implanted into My Finger for Science, and It Was Amazingly Weird.” Splinter, Splinternews.com, 6 Apr. 2016, splinternews.com/i-got-a-magnent-implanted-into-my-finger-for-science-an-1793856036.

 

I consider this practice of body modification to be pretty interesting. I feel like the perception of biohacking in two ways. As a push in the forefront of science and technology if these procedures and innovations are happening in a laboratory. Or it can be seen as a fringed subculture in which those in the community are rebelling against what is the norm. I feel like I see where this community is misunderstood because they are trying to push the forefront of what technology and our bodies can do. While some do it in the lab under the name of science, some do it at home under the name of hacking. When biohacking your body to control your robotic arm is legitimate yet placing your public transport pass in your hand sends you to court such as in the case of Meow Meow . The act of biohacking is a method of body modification in which I cannot see any cultural appropriation happening. As for the long term impacts of the practice that is yet to besee, as during my research I have not seen many individuals leave their biohacks apart from the fingertip magnets in their bodies for more than a few hours to months. Also, this new form of body modification is so new that any data on significant impacts from years of hacking ones body is not available.

 

Melendez, Steven. “Under My Skin: The New Frontier Of Digital Implants.” Fast Company, Fast Company, 18 June 2016, www.fastcompany.com/3059769/ive-got-you-under-my-skin-the-new-frontier-of-digital-implants.

 

 

Works Cited

 

 

  • Melendez, Steven. “Under My Skin: The New Frontier Of Digital Implants.” Fast Company, Fast Company, 18 June 2016, www.fastcompany.com/3059769/ive-got-you-under-my-skin-the-new-frontier-of-digital-implants.
  • Dole, Nick. “Meow-Meow’s Travel Pass Implant Could Be Deactivated.” ABC News, 28 June 2017, abc.net.au/news/2017-06-28/opal-card-meow-meow-implant-could-be-deactivated-by-authorities/8658986.
  • Madrigal, Alexis. “I Got a Magnet Implanted into My Finger for Science, and It Was Amazingly Weird.” Splinter, Splinternews.com, 6 Apr. 2016, splinternews.com/i-got-a-magnent-implanted-into-my-finger-for-science-an-1793856036.
  • Melendez, Steven. “Under My Skin: The New Frontier Of Digital Implants.” Fast Company, Fast Company, 18 June 2016, www.fastcompany.com/3059769/ive-got-you-under-my-skin-the-new-frontier-of-digital-implants.

DT is a graduate student at Old Dominion University’s Institute for the Humanities. He earned his BA in English with an Emphasis in Journalism from Old Dominion. He is most interested with topics relating to sexuality, sex, and gender especially how these topics are discussed and viewed in various cultures and classes around the world.